‎Kibbe on Liberty: Ep 120 | Freedom Lets Ordinary People Do Extraordinary Things | Guest: Peter Boettke on Apple Podcasts

Matt Kibbe sits down with economist Peter Boettke to discuss his new book, “The Struggle for a Better World,” about the hope that comes along with the vision of a free society. Too often, economists are seen as raining on the parades of the do-gooders who want to fix injustice in society. Boettke argues that we can be just as positive and inspiring as progressives, only instead of depending on privileged elites to solve our problems for ...

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Freedom Lets Ordinary People Do Extraordinary Things | Guest: Peter Boettke | Ep 120

Matt Kibbe sits down with economist Peter Boettke to discuss his new book, “The Struggle for a Better World,” about the hope that comes along with the vision of a free society. Too often, economists are seen as raining on the parades of the do-gooders who want to fix injustice in society. Boettke argues that we can be just as positive and inspiring as progressives, only instead of depending on privileged elites to solve our problems for ...

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US Businesses Are Closing Because They Can't Find Anyone to Work. Here’s Why

For the last 10 years, Larry and Roxane Maggio ran a deli in New Jersey. Last month they closed their doors forever—“and not because business is bad.” “We just can’t find anyone to work,” Roxane Maggio told the Philadelphia Inquirer. The Maggios are not alone.

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A May Day Lesson: The Real Reason Wages Rise | Lawrence W. Reed

The communist leaders of the thankfully extinct Soviet Empire loved May Day. The first day of the fifth month featured boisterous proclamations about “worker solidarity” and huge parades of military hardware in their capital cities. We were all supposed to be impressed or fearful, or both, I guess. I was neither because I assumed that their toys and their workers worked no better than their barren, low-wage, socialized economies. May Day ...

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The Faith of Entrepreneurs | Llewellyn H. Rockwell Jr.

Ludwig von Mises didn’t like references to the "miracle" of the marketplace or the "magic" of production or other terms that suggest that economic systems depend on some force that is beyond human comprehension. In his view, we are better off coming to a rational understanding of why markets are responsible for astounding levels of productivity that can support exponential increases in population and ever higher living ...

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Markets Help People Care For You Without Caring About You

As many economists and other commentators have pointed out, markets turn the miraculous into the mundane. Paris gets fed, Frederic Bastiat reminds us. We look with proper wonder at the complex system that gave Parisians their daily bread. Today, if anything, Paris, Texas and Paris, France are fed too much. Moreover, many things that would have been significant problems years ago are minor inconveniences now. Sometimes people sneer when ...

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Stone Age Anti-Capitalism - HumanProgress

The free market, or, to use a more loaded term, capitalism, produces more wealth and higher standards of living than any other economic system that humanity has conceived and implemented. The differences in economic performance between South and North Korea, West and East Germany, Chile and Venezuela, Botswana and Zimbabwe, not to mention the United States and the Soviet Union, speak for themselves. In spite of that generally recognized fact, ...

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Liberty Winning?

Louis XIV had hundreds of servants who prepared him dinner. Today, my supermarket offers me a buffet Louis XIV couldn't imagine. Thanks to trade and property rights and markets, each of us lives as if we had more servants than kings.

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How Markets Have Delivered More Economic Equality

I recently attended the Soho Forum debate between (democratic socialist) Ben Burgis and (libertarian) Gene Epstein on the question of whether capitalism or socialism would lead to the most prosperity, equality, and liberty. Ben took it for granted that a socialist economy would be more equal, and Gene did not fight hard on this point; indeed, libertarians were once fond of saying, “While capitalism may yield the unequal distribution of ...

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Quotation of the Day…

(Don Boudreaux) Tweet… is from pages 125-126 of University of Notre Dame philosopher James Otteson’s superb and hot-off-the-Cambridge-University-Press book, Seven Deadly Economic Sins (2021) (three links added; footnote deleted): What has changed over humanity’s recent history is not biology, psychology, physiology, ecology, or geography. What has changed, instead, is their attitudes. As economic historian Deirdre McCloskey has ...

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Liberty Winning?

Thanks to property rights and free markets, humanity has achieved prosperity and freedom that our ancestors hardly dreamed about.----To make sure you receive the weekly video from Stossel TV, sign up here: https://johnstossel.activehosted.com/f/1----For most of history, kings and tyrants ruled. They took and kept slaves, confiscated property, and waged decades-long wars.Then, "around 1700, suddenly, limited government and property rights, ...

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The fallacy of capitalism’s ‘race to the bottom’

The Biden administration proposes a global minimum tax on corporations to end the “global race to the bottom.” Leaving aside the wisdom of letting France tax U.S.-based corporations, this phrase recalls one of the regnant canards of our time: Capitalism inevitably lowers living standards and grinds people down into poverty. Continue Reading... Related posts: The Digital Divide And The Uselessness Of Race Work as flourishing in prison: The ...

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Capitalism vs. Socialism

Lazear points to several specific examples. First, China: in the 1980s, the Chinese Communist government began to adopt market-based reforms. Lazear finds that the market reforms, as skeptics of capitalism would predict, did increase income inequality. But, more importantly, the market reforms lifted millions of people out of poverty. Lazear notes: Today, the poorest Chinese earn five times as much as they did just two decades earlier. ...

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You Think This Is A Game? Not Quite

How often have you heard or read someone use a sports analogy to describe commercial society? Games are great fun, but they have winners and losers in ways exchanges don’t. Exchange is not, as Manuel F. Ayau reminds us, a zero-sum game. Here are a few ways sports and games don’t map cleanly into the business world. The Market is Not Monopoly. This classic from Parker Brothers, which is outstandingly enjoyable if played correctly, combines ...

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Worried about climate issues and poverty rates? Andrew McAfee has good news – Acton Institute PowerBlog

Things are getting better. A lot better. If you spend a significant amount of time watching cable news, this may come as a surprise. So, how much better is the world getting? Currently, less than 10 percent of the global population lives in extreme poverty! Yet, a study from Barna recently found that 67 percent of Americans believe the global poverty rate to be increasing. The good news doesn’t stop simply stop there. Globally, people are ...

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A Different Shade of Green

When Terry Anderson and Donald Leal published the first edition of their book Free Market Environmentalism in 1991, the idea was met with mixed reviews. “Free market environmentalism is an oxymoron,” wrote one reviewer, “and the authors are the moron part.”The dominant belief at the time was that markets are the cause of environmental degradation, not the solution. And the idea that property rights could be harnessed to improve ...

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Quotation of the Day…

… is from page 14 of the late, great Julian Simon’s Introduction to his brilliant 1995 edited volume, The State of Humanity: When considering the state of the environment, we should think first of the terrible pollutions that were banished in the past century or wo – the typhoid that polluted such rivers as the Hudson, smallpox that humanity has finally pursued to the ends of the earth and just about eradicated, the dysentery the ...

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Rugged entrepreneurs: How the ‘frontier experience’ shapes economic cultures

In our efforts to spur economic growth and retain American dynamism, we tend to be overly consumed by surface-level tweaks to our economic systems. Yet economists continue to discover that the distinguishing features of flourishing societies are more readily found at the levels of culture. Continue Reading... Related posts: The frontier spirit of ‘The Martian’ The cultural mandate and the final frontier The Moral Value of Economic Growth ...

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Your Career Is an Enterprise

Economics distinguishes between workers and entrepreneurs in the market. These are often misconceived as mutually exclusive classes. Every individual wears many economic hats. Talking in terms of classes leads many people to pigeonhole themselves. Those who don’t run a business often think of themselves as worker drones: as just another factor of production to be allocated by their entrepreneurial betters. They are the passive “employed” ...

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Resources Are More Abundant Than Ever, and People Are the Reason - HumanProgress

Our research into the relative abundance of resources began when we looked at updating the famous wager between the cornucopian University of Maryland economist Julian Simon (1932–1998) and three neo-Malthusian scholars: the Stanford University biologist Paul Ehrlich; the University of California, Berkeley ecologist John Harte; and the University of California, Berkeley scientist and future director of President Barack Obama’s White House ...

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Is life today bad? Or is it awesome?  “Economics Made the World Great” shows changes that have taken place in the past three centuries that have made the world better. Can it be better still?

Jon Favreau’s heartwarming 2014 independent film, “Chef”, is a case study in entrepreneurial value creation. Even better, it shows us how we can achieve economic success and personal fulfillment simultaneously, provided that we figure out how to take our passions and turn them towards making other people’s lives better.

Magatte Wade was born in Senegal but spent much of her childhood in France. Growing up, she saw the extreme differences in wealth between Africa and Europe. This disparity sparked a question… Why are some countries rich, and others poor?

How do we summarize the 2010s? Many think it was an awful decade, ten years of horror, unfair distribution and environmental disaster.

It’s a Wonderful Loaf is an ode to the hidden harmony that is all around us–the seeming magical ways that we anticipate and meet the needs of each other without anyone being in charge.